Asakusa

Asakusa Imahan

Asakusa Imahan

Asakusa Imahan is the birthplace of beef tsukudani and a very old sukiyaki and shabu shabu restaurant that opened in 1895. The restaurant started as a beef pot eatery in Azumabashi, Honjo and later moved to Asakusa. After the restaurant building was lost to a fire following the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923, an elaborately designed structure, modeled after the legendary Sea God's Palace, was constructed. This surprised many people, and the new building became popularly known as the “Imahan Palace.” It was so unique that even a postcard picturing the restaurant was printed. Japanese novelist Kafuu Nagai was a regular here, and the restaurant often appears in his diary, “Danchoteinichijo.”

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Dozeu Iidaya

Dozeu Iidaya

Iidaya is a loach restaurant that opened in the mid Meiji period. Loaches have been loved by the common people since the Edo period, and at Dozeu Iidaya you will enjoy the delicacy with the soup stock that has been passed down since the restaurant's beginning. The most popular is the loach stew with the whole fish cooked inside a nabe pot, but for first timers, they also have the “honenuki nabe” or “boneless pot” in which loaches with head and bones removed are used. The loaches are enjoyed best when eaten with green onions and burdock shavings.

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Sankaku

Sankaku

Sankaku is a historic pufferfish restaurant along Asakusa's Chuo Street that opened in 1902. The high quality of the food here has remained unchanged for over a century. The transparent flesh of the pufferfish sashimi and “fuguchiri,” or pufferfish pot, are so tasty that they are in the league of their own. The nikogori, deep fry, fin sake, soft roe are also very popular. The restaurant also serves non-pufferfish seafood such as monkfish livers, sea cucumbers and crabs.

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Myogaya

Myogaya

The name of the store is pronounced as “Myogaya”, although it is written as “meugaya.” The place has attracted people of Asakusa since 1867. Inside, you will find Hanten (traditional short coat), Obi (sash over kimono), Momohiki (working trousers), Koikuchi shirts (shirt worn under kimono), Jikatabi (working rubber shoes), Waraji (straw sandals), Waraji-kake (worn with Waraji), Tenugui (hand towel), and Zori (Japanese sandals) and just about any other Japanese festival-related items imaginable.

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Nakaya

Nakaya

Established in 1910, Nakaya, in front of Sensoji, specializes in festival garments and accessories. You can find here "Hanten (traditional short coat)" and "Momohiki (working trousers)", Tenugui (hand towel), and Tabi (traditional Japanese socks) which are all practicable and well-designed. . There is a branch location on the Nakamise Street. Products from this store are also popular as souvenirs.

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Candy Craft Ameshin

Candy Craft Ameshin

In 2013, Ameshin was opened for preservation and development of candy craft, an unique Japanese tradition. Ameshin sells and displays beautiful candy crafts and even hold classes for those who want to learn the delicious art. Some of the items by master candy artists that are on display include life-like goldfish, an octupus and a lion, all of which look like they will begin moving at any moment. All works are so lively and precisely crafted that your brain may not believe your eyes.

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Kaneso

Kaneso

Chefs from famous restaurants, Japanese celebrity chefs like Nobuko Shimizu of “Today's Meal” and Kentaro from “Men's Meal,” all flock to this cutlery store with history dating back to 1873. Here you will find knives and other cutting tools that professionals choose to use.

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Yoshiwara Mikaeri Yanagi

Yoshiwara Mikaeri Yanagi

Back when Yoshiwara red-light district was still in existence, there was a willow tree planted on the side of the street that one would take when heading from Asakusa to Yoshiwara. After spending time in the red-light district, customers who crossed the gate out of Yoshiwara would stop and look back by the willow tree as if they left their hearts behind in Yoshiwara. The famed tree has been mentioned in many poems and it is definitely an important piece of Asakusa history. Today, the tree is long gone, but there is a stone monument in its place. A willow tree was later planted by the monument in the Showa period.

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Unosuke Miyamoto Store

Unosuke Miyamoto Store

Since 1861, Unosuke Miyamoto Store has been in the business of manufacturing, reparing and selling taiko drums, flute, mikoshi and other festival related products. Some of the clients of this prestigious store include the Imperial Household Agency, Kabuki-za and the National Theater of Japan. Since after the Second World War, this store has been responsible for creating Asakusa Shrine's mikoshi every May for the famous Sanja Festival. Also, many of the 44 neighborhoods that participate in the Sanja Festival have their mikoshi made here every year. Inside the store, you will find many kabuki and fetival-related items, making you feel festive just by taking a walk inside the store.

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The Eight Notables of Edo

The Eight Notables of Edo

Stores along the Denpoin Street can be enjoyed even after hours. Painted on the shutters of eight stores are eight historical figures of Edo. The paintings include that of a man who had significant influence on the Meiji Restoration, the father of kabuki, the first person in Japan who is said to have eaten ramen and Mitsukuni Tokugawa, the lord of Mito clan. Can you guess whose paintings are on all eight shutters?

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