Asakusa

Denpoin Street

Denpoin Street

Denpoin Street lies between Nakamise Yanagi and Asakusa Rokku Streets and stretches about 200m to the left and right of Denpoin. There are two ways to enjoy this shopping street that resemble the old townscape from the Edo period. The first way is to take a stroll on the street when all the stores are closed. You will notice that some of the stores have painted on their shutters famous people from the Edo period. The second way, of course, is to come here when the stores are open. There are many unique shops that deal with items that are found nowhere else. Most items are reasonably priced, so finding a souvenir will not be a problem. Along the street, there are items such as fire bells and water tubs that you may have seen on the streets of old Edo.

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Sakura Nabe Nakae

Sakura Nabe Nakae

Sakura nabe, or horse meat cooked like sukiyaki, was very popular in Yoshiwara. In the Meiji period, there were numerous restaurants serving sakura nabe, but today only Nakae, established in 1905, remains. The first generation owner introduced a type of sakura nabe using miso-based broth and that became the root of today's sakura nabe. The restaurant building, constructed a year after the Great Kanto Earthquake in the Taisho period, is designated as a tangible cultural property. The structure miraculously survived through the Great Tokyo Air Raid during World War II and is a rare piece of architecture from which you can feel its long history.

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Irokawa

Irokawa

Irokawa was established in 1861, a year after the famous Sakurada Mon Incident. This unagi restaurant stands on a back street among a lantern shop, a liquor store, and Edo yuzen speciality store. Inside the restaurant is cozy and tasteful. Recommended food here is the unaju from which emanates sweet and tasty aroma just as you open the lid. The mix of perfectly cooked unagi and rich sauce is craftsmanship at its finest.

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Marubell-Do

Marubell-Do

This bromide photo store was started in 1921. As soon as you take a step into this shop with a nostalgic Showa feel, you will notice the walls filled with bromides, or “puromaido” as Marubell-Do calls them. You will see “puromaido” of idols, actors, singers and other famous stars. “Puromaido” of approximately 2500 stars have been taken by this shop and they only sell their original photos. You can even have your very own “puromaido” taken just like the idols from the 80s.

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Namiki Yabusoba

Namiki Yabusoba

Also known as “Yabusoba,” this is one of the most historic soba eatery in all of Tokyo. The “Yabu” is named as one of the three main lines of soba in Edo along with the “Sunaba” and “Sarashina.” It is unknown exactly when the “Yabu” line of soba started, but at least by around 1750, there already were soba eatery going by “Yabusoba.” Some literature suggest that Yabusoba was already in existence by 1735. One distinctive characteristic of Yabusoba is the salty dipping sauce with a strong taste of soy sauce. This naturally led to the Edo-style of soba eating of dipping the noodles only slightly in the sauce. The Yabusoba became increasingly famous when 10th generation Basho Kingentei, before going into the famous rakugo “Sobasei,” mentioned a story of an Edoite who passes away after saying “I wished to eat soba with a lot of dipping sauce.”

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Nakasei

Nakasei

Nakasei was established in 1870. This historic Edomae style tempura restaurant features a tranquil inner garden with a pond and a teahouse-style detached guest room. The origin of the restaurant goes back to when the founder Tetsuzo Nakagawa opened a stall on Hirokooji Street. In 1870, the restaurant came to occupy a space in front of the Asakusa Public Hall, where it stands today. The signature menu item “Raijin age” was named by French literature researcher Dr. Yutaka Tatsuno, who thought it looked like the “lightning drum” carried by the Lightning God at the Kaminari Mon. The restaurant makes frequent appearances in the works of literary great Kafuu Nagai.

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Bunsendo

Bunsendo

Bunsendo is a Japanese fan shop that opened in 1890. Many popular kabuki actors and rakugo storytellers choose this historic store for their fan needs. You can also find fans for everyday use. The Edo-style fans such as the “mochisen” and “shibusen,” which is painted with persimmon juice, are among the top sellers.

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Sato Sample

Sato Sample

Sato Sample started producing food replicas in Shinbashi in 1925. In 1945, the store was moved to the present location in Kappa Bashi as the street's first food replica store. Since its establishment, the store has stuck to “Made in Japan” and has continued to hand produce each and every one of their products. Since moving to Kappa Bashi, Sato Sample has switched their main ingredient for the food samples from wax to vinyl chloride to make tougher, more realistic products. The food replicas are so realistic that they satisfy both food experts and food replica enthusiasts alike.

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Tsujiya Main Store

Tsujiya Main Store

Tsujiya opened in 1912 as a store that specializes in geta clogs. The store carries a rich variety of leather-soled sandals, geta clogs, and other Japanese sandals that are loved by many experts from the geisha community and show business. The statue in front of the store is that of Nippondaemon, the leader of “Shiranami Gonin Otoko.”

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Konohana

Konohana

This natural yeast bakery is operated by two close sisters who were born in Asakusa. The two sisters used to bake as a hobby, but the older sister, Mayumi, got so hooked in baking that she eventually opened a baking class. As she watched the smiles on the faces of her students, she decided to open up a bakery. Megumi, the younger sister, agreed to the idea and the two got together to open the bakery. All of their bread is made from homemade yeast cultivated from raisin and domestic wheat. The ingredients are simple, but that enhances the taste of wheat and enables you to enjoy the bread's firm texture. The popular items are not only plain bread and other speciality bread, but bagles and scorns are big sellers as well. Although not open regularly, the in-store cafe is popular where you can enjoy tasty bread along with freshly brewed coffee.

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